Letter: Miller offers thanks

Dear Editor:
The apostle Paul reminds us to give thanks in everything. Sometimes that can be hard but I believe that an everyday attitude of thankfulness, as well as an attitude of constant prayer will make our lives less stressful and more abundant. When we find ourselves prone to take everyday blessings for granted we can breathe the child’s prayer, “Father we thank you for the night and for the morning’s pleasant light; for rest and food and loving care and all that makes the world so fair.”
On days when we feel like a motherless child we can thank God for the promise that He’ll never leave or forsake us. And when it seems nowadays that all Hell is breaking loose we can trust that God’s plans for us are good, that we have a hope and a future.
I am thankful that Felton and I are privileged to have raised our family in this small community where dear hearts and gentle people know and care for one another regardless of race or creed. 
I am thankful we have a hospital with competent professional staff to provide prompt service. In giving thanks this week, I especially want to express my thanks to the people who were on call the night of Oct. 31 when I experienced a “minor” heart attack. In spite of my protestations of “I’m all right now. I need to go back home. I’m not getting in an ambulance and going to University.” Dr. Yarboro, nurses Nancy Malone and Ashley Willis, technicians Isabel Lopez and May Ann Bello calmly and gently persuaded me to stay while they monitored my situation, consulted cardiologists in Augusta, performed pre-admittance duties and readied me for that ambulance ride. 
Special thanks to Kathy Burke at the admittance desk for her kindness “above and beyond the call of duty.” Having heard our discussion about Felton’s poor eyesight and knowing my concern for his welfare, Kathy insisted that he call to let her know he arrived safely at our house after having been awake all night. Kathy then relayed the message to me as I lay trussed and trembling on the gurney, under the care of ambulance attendants Roy and Dennis. There again, nobody could have been more efficient and helpful than these two young men. While Roy drove, Dennis sat with me in the back and carried on a steady conversation to set me at ease, although his jokes about Roy’s driving were not particularly comforting. Thanks to Isabel’s husband for providing me with the names I didn’t remember from my tricky Halloween adventure.
Dr. Bowman who performed my catheterization in Augusta reassured me and prayed for me and his team before the procedure. Thanks to my family and to my very own private duty nurse, Jean Miller, who already knows I’m crazy and loves me anyway!
Let’s all love one another right now!
Gratefully,
Marianne Miller
Louisville